The student news site of the San Diego School of Creative & Performing Arts

The Production

AP ART HISTORY AND THE FUTURE OF COLLEGE COURSES

Jean Reyes and Perla Limon

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






 

 

The 2017 school year has successfully started smoothly and SDSCPA is happy to welcome new staff members into our learning environment. A new addition to the counseling department is Mrs. Kara Teschner, who is responsible for countless recent schedule changes and transitions. We also welcome a college professor from City College, Doug Dailard, who insists on being addressed as Doug.

“I just don’t like titles. Both my parents had PhDs and they never used them. I was just kind of raised that way,” says Doug.

Twice a week, Doug lectures about Art History in room 124. However, the course has been changed since the last time it was offered. He’s been teaching the course for “well over half a century” and has traveled to countless of the notable sites of Art History. He teaches a very mellow class twice a week, encouraging learning, understanding, and recognition rather than memorization.

Previously, Art History at SCPA was taught by Mrs. Melinda Meyer-ward. Inherently, the structure of the former and current class is fundamentally different; the content is quite shuffled as well. The class is labeled AP, however, the college course does not directly correlate with the matching AP exam.

Doug lectures with an emphasis on developing recognitive skills, comprehension of historical context, and identification of attributes, technology, technique, and intention. He doesn’t teach with infrastructure that guides students in taking the exam. “Well, you could take the AP exam, but if he’s not teaching with the 250 images, it might be really hard to pass the exam…” Ward says.

Doug seems to agree. “This really should be called an art survey class, because we aren’t gonna get really in depth in any particular culture. We aren’t gonna get into that kind of specificity. We’re just trying to connect the images with cultures and how they served the cultures,” he explains

 

Differences aside, Art History is not just another history class. “…you’re connecting historical people with historical artifacts they held or made, and I think that’s what makes it interesting…” Doug says. It’s the human connection across time periods and settings that make Art History so enriching and wholesome. It’s not solely about defining conflicts and analyzing actions; it’s about thinking historically, empathetically, and understanding thematic motivations humans have had for a very long time, across the globe.

Although the course is intrinsically image-based, it’s not all about seeing a picture and generalizing artifacts. “…the writing tools, I think the visual literacy, and the art component, with integrating historical context. You have a lot of multicultural world history knowledge… It just makes you a fully rounded person.” The course content itself enhances students’ ability in “… understanding the form, and function, the content, and the context… those are the four skills that it really builds on…”

Regardless of the structure, the class and content itself lend to useful skills and a heightened academic experience. “Here, you would receive two high school credits, and two to three college credits, depending on how many hours you meet during the week,” Teschner explains. Not only does this present opportunity accelerate students’ college education, but it concurrently satisfies high school VAPA graduation requirements if they perform well in these advanced classes.

On the other hand, though there are far more benefits (credit-wise) to college classes, there are just as many new risks posed to the student should they fail. Students with failing grades can be placed on academic probation, miss out on financial aid opportunities [FAFSA], earn a lower High School GPA, and lower their GPA at city college, starting them off on the wrong foot in the higher education system.

This first year of Art History holds quite a bit of importance, not only for students but for the future of  SCPA’s college courses altogether. “If I can prove to the district that I’ve got a strong academic base here, then they’ll be willing to give me more classes. And the more [college] classes we get here, the lower your academic class sizes will be,” says Teschner.

For example, if instead of offering AP Stats, that teacher can teach another Integrated III class. Those classes will be smaller because the seniors and the juniors who need higher level math will be taking the college class version of many of the academic classes we have here now. “It’s a win-win for everybody,” says Teschner.

Looking to the future, there are countless ways to branch out with these classes. English, history, and math classes have potential in the upcoming years of SCPA, though it will depend on what students want. “If you’re really accelerated in math, and you take Integrated I and two in middle school, and you take integrated three in freshman year, that’ll give you three years to take college classes,” says Teschner, “If not, even during just senior year you have the option to start taking college-level classes.”

Ward says, “It gives you this worldly knowledge that you don’t really get until you sit in an art history class. And it’s one of those courses where you walk in knowing next to nothing, and you learn everything about it.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • AP ART HISTORY AND THE FUTURE OF COLLEGE COURSES

    School/Community

    HOMECOMING IS RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER

  • AP ART HISTORY AND THE FUTURE OF COLLEGE COURSES

    Features

    ALUMNUS JAMES MASLOW PAYS A VISIT TO SCPA

  • AP ART HISTORY AND THE FUTURE OF COLLEGE COURSES

    School/Community

    ASB Revamps Coffee House

  • AP ART HISTORY AND THE FUTURE OF COLLEGE COURSES

    Uncategorized

    JYP ENTERTAINMENT RELEASES A NEW SURVIVAL TRAINEE SHOW

  • AP ART HISTORY AND THE FUTURE OF COLLEGE COURSES

    Opinion/Editorial

    TURKEY SEASON HAS ARRIVED

  • AP ART HISTORY AND THE FUTURE OF COLLEGE COURSES

    Uncategorized

    POPULAR KOREAN BOY BAND RELEASES THEIR LONG AWAITED COMEBACK

  • AP ART HISTORY AND THE FUTURE OF COLLEGE COURSES

    School/Community

    NEW FACE ON THE BLOCK: CARTOON CORNER

  • School/Community

    WHY THE PSAT IS CRUCIAL

  • AP ART HISTORY AND THE FUTURE OF COLLEGE COURSES

    School/Community

    HOW MIDDLE SCHOOLERS ACTUALLY FEEL ABOUT HIGH SCHOOLERS

  • AP ART HISTORY AND THE FUTURE OF COLLEGE COURSES

    Features

    HALLOWEEN MOVIES FOR YOU TO WATCH THIS YEAR

The student news site of the San Diego School of Creative & Performing Arts
AP ART HISTORY AND THE FUTURE OF COLLEGE COURSES